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Fertility Corner



by  http://www.resolve.org/takecharge

What is infertility?
Infertility is a disease or condition of the reproductive system often diagnosed after a couple has had one year of unprotected, well-timed intercourse, or if the woman has suffered from multiple miscarriages and the woman is under 35 years of age. If the woman is over 35 years old, it is diagnosed after 6 months of unprotected, well-timed intercourse.

Who gets it?
Infertility is a medical problem. Approximately 30% of infertility is due to a female factor and 30% is due to a male factor. In the balance of the cases, infertility results from problems in both partners or the cause of the infertility cannot be explained.

What are the risk factors?

  • Weight
  • Age
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
  • Tubal Disease
  • Endometriosis
  • DES Exposure
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol

What are the signs and symptoms?
Often there are no signs or symptoms associated with an infertility problem. Listening to your body and getting regular checkups will help to detect a problem. Early detection and treatment of a problem are often critical in achieving successful pregnancy outcomes later.

How is infertility treated?
Medical technology now offers more answers and treatment options to men and women trying to conceive a child. From hormonal treatments, ovulation induction and Intrauterine insemination to more advanced technologies like in vitro fertilization, ICSI to surrogacy, egg/sperm donation and even embryo donation. For more information on treatment of infertility visit the Family Building Options section of our site.

What medications are used?
There are a variety of medications used to treat infertility. It is important to understand the medications and what their purpose is and to speak with your physician about the medications that will be used in your specific treatment plan. Read more about Fertility Medications.

What is artificial insemination?
Artificial insemination is now more commonly referred to as IUI (intrauterine insemination). It is a procedure used for couples with unexplained infertility, minimal male factor infertility, and women with cervical mucus problems. The procedure uses the husband's or donor's sperm, washing and treating the sperm, and then injecting it into the woman during the time of ovulation. Read more about IUI.

What is In Vitro or IVF?
In vitro fertilization (IVF) gets its name from the fact that fertilization occurs outside of the woman's body, in a lab dish instead of a woman's fallopian tubes. Typically, a woman will use ovulation stimulating drugs to produce an excess number of eggs. These eggs are surgically removed from the woman and fertilized in dish with sperm. If fertilization takes place, the physician transfers the embryo(s) into the women's uterus. Read more about IVF.

(source: RESOLVE)

Articles:

10 surprising fertility facts we bet you didn't know
By CAITLIN BRODY

Sure, you may know your stuff when it comes to temping and taking your prenatals, but trust us, there's a lot more to understanding your fertility than that.
1. You're most fertile before you ovulate.
Believe it or not, in addition to the day you actually ovulate, you're most likely to get pregnant if you have sex in the five days or so before. Here's why: Once the egg leaves your ovary, your guy's sperm has about 12 to 24 hours to get to it for conception to happen. But sperm can actually remain viable inside you for several days or even weeks after you two actually get it on. So to put it bluntly, the more swimmers you've got in there ahead of time, the higher your odds are of making a baby.
Read More...http://www.kansascity.com/2010/11/08/2405097/10-surprising-fertility-facts.html?story_link=email_msg
 

NIH study indicates stress may delay women getting pregnant

Women with high levels of substance indicating stress less likely to conceive

A study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and the University of Oxford supports the widespread belief that stress may reduce a woman's chance of becoming pregnant. The study is the first of its kind to document, among women without a history of fertility problems, an association between high levels of a substance indicative of stress and a reduced chance of becoming pregnant.(if you want full article, please email me at [email protected]

While stress does not cause infertility, infertility most definitely causes stress. Infertile women report higher levels of stress and anxiety than fertile women, and there is some indication that infertile women are more likely to become depressed. This is not surprising since the far-reaching effects of infertility can interfere with work, family, money and sex. Finding ways to reduce stress, tension and anxiety can make you feel better. 

There are numerous methods for decreasing stress,... (if you want complete text, please email your request at [email protected]

What can I do to reduce my stress?
 

·         Talk to your partner.
·         Realize you're not alone. Talk to other people who have
·         infertility, through individual or couple counseling, or support
·         groups.
·         Read books on infertility, which will show you that your
·         feelings are normal and can help you deal with them.
·          Learn stress reduction techniques such as meditation, yoga, or
·         acupuncture.
·          Avoid taking too much caffeine or other stimulants.
·          Exercise regularly to release physical and emotional tension.
·          Have a medical treatment plan with which both you and your
·         partner are comfortable.
·          Learn as much as you can about the cause of your infertility
·         and the treatment options available.
·         Find out as much as you can about your insurance coverage and
·         make financial plans regarding your fertility treatments.

Talking about Infertility

When you are experiencing infertility, communicating with family and friends can be difficult and challenging. Even the most caring relative or friend may offer a "helpful" suggestion that will appear wildly insensitive to you.
Here are some tips for talking about infertility with family and friends, if you decide to do so.

  • Decide how much detail you and your partner want to share. Respect each other's need for privacy about certain details.
  • It may help to rehearse exactly what you are going to say. Decide on specific words or phrases to use, such as of ”infertility” or "we are trying to get pregnant and seem to be having a problem"
  • Pick a time to talk when people are not rushed or distracted. Make sure it is a private place where you won’t feel embarrassed to show emotion.
  • Explain that infertility is a life crisis, and that 1 in 8 couples, or more than 7 million people experience it
  • Let them know how they can support you—whether you want phone calls, questions, etc.
  • Explain that you may need a break from family gatherings, and that it isn't about them—it’s about using your energy wisely.
  • Tell them that you will share results about a treatment or procedure when you feel up to it, and not to ask about pregnancy tests or treatment results.
(source: RESOLVE)  

Affirmations

 For an affirmation to be effective, you need the following conditions: 

Use the 1st person singular "I" 
Only use the present tense.
They must be said with conviction and repeated often.
They must be specific.

Examples of affirmations:

As my sadness lifts away a renewed sense of hope settles in my heart.


I set my worries aside and I allow my body to do its job


Every cell in my body vibrates with energy and health

I  now release all unwanted built-up emotional patterns that prevent me from connecting to my inner self

I am the author of my life

I focus on the power of now

I am now a loving parent to myself.

I live in the field of all possibilities